The Masters Revisited with Mental Golf: Bad Golfing

The Masters Revisited with Mental Golf: Bad Golfing

The Masters revisited with mental golf: bad golfing… Honestly, what comes to mind? If it’s something other than Henrik Stenson, we’ve got to have a talk. He was at the top of the leaderboard until he landed a quadruple-bogey 8 (at the par-4 18th). That was on Thursday. Stenson commented: “Finishing with an 8, I don’t think I’ve ever done that.” How did it happen? Stenson explained that “You make a little mistake and then you compound it with another one, and it just keeps on snowballing, and I got the snowman in the end.”

But Stenson’s not the only one who came up with some bad numbers. Cameron Morfit, writer for GOLF Magazine, talks about Mickelson’s triple-bogey:

Nothing was more bizarre, however, than Mickelson’s making triple-bogey on the fourth hole. His tee shot missed left, clanged off the grandstand railing and ricocheted into the bushes. The shot recalled Jean Van de Velde’s misadventure in losing the 1999 British Open, which also involved a shot off a grandstand railing.

After being allowed to touch his ball in order to identify it, Mickelson tried twice to extricate it right-handed, turning his club toe-down. His second effort nearly hit his left leg, and he was lying three on hard-packed dirt. From there, he dumped his fourth shot short, into the sand. His bunker shot nearly went in, and he tapped in for his 6 — the antipode to Oosthuizen’s albatross.

So the Masters revisited with mental golf: bad golfing focused on two of the worst. But I want to clue you in on what I think was the trigger for Stenson’s blunder… He said himself: “You make a little mistake and then you compound it with another one, and it just keeps on snowballing.” That’s true – but only if you let it happen. Mental golf says to let it go. The snowball effect is only if it keeps on going. You have the power to stop it.

What do you do when you feel like you’re in a bad groove? Learn some quick tips for how to be in control of your game right here: http://www.golfersmind.com/mental-golf/

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